GI.biz retells the story of the EDGE fiasco from a decade ago.

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Such legal fights often play out slowly, but this one was a first-round knockout for EA. In October of 2010, less than four months after Langdell filed the suit, a judge tossed it out and accused Langdell of doctoring some of the evidence he submitted to prove he had actually been actively using the trademark for business and not just suing people over it. For example, he produced a box for a game Edge supposedly produced in 2004, but it contained a website address Edge had not even registered until 2008

[It's time to tell the scary story of Edge Games, Tim Langdell, and the trademark dispute that would not die](https://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/2020-09-30-the-thing-about-trolls-is-they-regenerate-10-years-ago-this-month)

Plot Twist:
It is still ongoing!

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A couple months after Langdell‘s Edge trademarks were cancelled, Papazian’s company Mobigame filed its own trademark application for the use of “Edge” in computer games and entertainment. As you might have guessed, Langdell objected.

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The fight dragged on for years, until Mobigame missed a deadline on some paperwork and its trademark application was abandoned in early 2019. Mobigame has since requested that the USPTO Trademark Trial and Appeal Board reinstate the application, but it may be too late.

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The abandonment of Mobigame‘s application cleared the way for three of Langdell’s own years-old trademark applications for “Edge Games,” “Edge PC,” and “Edge Gaming PC.” Langdell asked the USPTO to reconsider his trademark requests, which have since been registered and are now active. Edge Games went through last December; the other two went into effect in February of this year.

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“We have been fighting trademark troll Tim Langdell for 10 years,” Mobigame said in a filing with the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board in August.