the mortal enemy of videogames

buddy…even the people participating aren’t smart enough to be here. more the merrier!

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what if kingdom hearts went to Voyage au bout de la nuit world

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vollmann did the forward for the new edition

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what if kingdom hearts went to Dhalgren world

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missed opportunity for a hogg joke

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inappropriate

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what if kingdom hearts went to Magic Mountain world. They could meet Hans Castorp

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real talk….i would like kingdom hearts to go to the world of Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa’s the leopard

i was gonna mention it earlier because it’s usually the first book that comes to mind whenever I start thinking about class intersecting with literature. in some ways i’m glad i read it before i started paying close attention to that stuff, because it’s likely i wouldn’t have picked it up had i encountered it later. or maybe i would have. who knows. i’ll still be reading proust one day.

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One could argue that this is what Delany did in 1975

I would never want someone to be under the misapprehension that I’m smart!
I just read a lot of books because I never learned how to do much else.

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I’d enjoy it if goofy or Donald said “to wound the autumnal city”

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I read a fair bit of Deleuze in graduate school. Fondest memory was of The Logic of Sense, where he plays around with Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland to get at stuff like sense and nonsense or different conceptions of time. It was good stuff, though I only ever could figure out how to apply Deleuze secondhand (via literary critics who use him).

Anyway, right now in pleasure reading I’m doing the sixth book in The Expanse series, which at this point I think of as Kim-Stanley-Robinson Light: what do non-FTL solar system politics look like where the focus on environmentalism, politics, or aesthetics is pulpy rather than sharp? I’m having fun.

Then today I checked out Smithsonian Books’ recent Space Shuttle Stories from the library, which features interviews from crew on every space shuttle mission talking about that mission, with some photos and a synopsis. I’m about ten missions in, and it’s good stuff, celebratory about the great things of space travel but unflinching about budgetary pressures and the two major accidents.

And I finally finished/slam-dunked Emily Wilson’s translation of The Odyssey. 10/10, would read/teach again. I want to read her version of The Iliad now, though I’ve never liked The Iliad as much. I might finally get through it with her.

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What if Sora, Goofy, and Donald Duck had to work on the foundation pit from The Foundation Pit

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What’s everybody’s preferred reading position? Something keeps persuading me to think I can read while reclined but I just fall asleep. Sitting cross-legged on a futon or carpeted floor, hunched over book in lap—that might do it.

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I’ve said this before itt but I read almost exclusively before bed, and it’s for this reason I have become an e-reader devotee, since then:

  1. Every book is the exact same weight and dimensions (fonts and page layouts are also generally the same but this is actually a slight by allowable mark against the experience of e-reading)
  2. I can hold the book in one hand and still turn the page with the same hand
  3. I can read in the dark without an external light, and because I have an e-reader with an e-ink screen and a backlight that can be very dim, this does not put strain on my eyes at all or keep me awake.

…so the preferred reading position is prone, laying on my side, with the book propped up on my pillow. Which side I lay on is dependent on how either side of my spine feels at the time. At certain times, this also means the hand not holding the book can be used to either hold my partner’s hand, or pet a little doggy.

There is no better way to read in the world!!

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I liked certain aspects of Wilson’s translation. I think her Translator’s Note or Intro or whatever she called those first 100 pages was the best part of the book. And I don’t mean that in a snide way. I genuinely found it great. It’s what sold me on the rest of the book.
I think it’s the easiest to follow version of The Odyssey but it’s sometimes rather artless, at least to my ear. Which isn’t the worst thing in the world!

I have her Iliad here and just need to dive on in, but I keep piling books on top of it.

I read All You Need is Kill recently which is pretty fun. Groundhog’s Day but for killing aliens instead. If that sounds like a pretty all right way to spend a few hours, check it out.

Read Virtual Light by William Gibson and I don’t know what it is with this fella, but I seem to love and hate his books in equal measure.

The Private Lives of Trees is my third or fourth Zambra book and I dig them all. Picking up the rest of them that have been translated to read soon.

My reread of Dhalgren was bizarre. I think I like it less this time, but there may never really be anything to compare to the first time you pick up a book like that. I found it much more aggressive this time or maybe just had less patience for Delany’s use of boredom. But you rarely come across a book that is deliberately fighting with you while still offering you hilarious and wild shit. Also, it’s grosser and lewder than I remember!

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I agree with everything you said here.

My preferred reading position is one I haven’t been able to pull off in a long time: laying down in a hammock.

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So you like my username? bats eyes

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i read all fucked up. mostly in bed these days, sometimes on the couch. i’ll switch between reclined and hunched over with book in lap. sometimes i’ll read on the exercise bike, other times i’ll read at a little table we have on the porch. i really like reading on planes and back when i was in school i really liked reading in libraries. i’m not opposed to e-readers but have too big a library to justify the investment.

when i was in grad school i got to use a private study carrel that was on the 10th or 11th floor of the library. the library itself was gigantic (i think u of i has the third largest system in the country or something?), but only a small sliver of it was open for public browsing. the rest of it, including the 10th or 11th floor, was closed off to everyone except for grad students and librarians. the books on my floor were all extensive law texts, like collections of 11th century hindu law and such. for that reason, the floor was always entirely empty except for myself. it was very dark, dusty, and industrial, like utilitarian metal bookshelves and only a handful of lights that were permanently turned on. my carrel was all the way in the back of the floor, so i had to walk through these dim aisles of old books to get there. it was a windowless room with a lock and key, so small you could touch both ends of it with no effort. there was no wifi up there, and before i’d go up i’d usually lock my phone inside a locker on the bottom floor. i got a lot of great reading and writing done there. i also listened to a lot of grouper when i had my laptop to write.

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